Ashkenazi

Something Happened to Ashkenazi Jews in Medieval Europe to Eliminate Genetic Diversity, Study Finds

Something Happened to Ashkenazi Jews in Medieval Europe to Eliminate Genetic Diversity, Study Finds

About two-thirds of Jews today – or about 10 million people – are Ashkenazim, referring to a recent Central and Eastern European origin. They primarily reside in the United States and Israel. Ashkenazi Jews carry a particularly high burden of disease-causing genetic mutations, such as those in the BRCA1 gene associated with an increased risk …

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Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time

Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time

A study of skeletons discovered in a medieval Jewish cemetery in Germany has revealed a startling genetic divide among medieval Ashkenazi Jews that no longer exists. The analysis, the first of its kind from a Jewish cemetery and the product of years-long negotiations between scientists, historians and religious leaders, shows that Ashkenazim have become genetically …

Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time Read More »

Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time

Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time

A study of skeletons discovered in a medieval Jewish cemetery in Germany has revealed a startling genetic divide among medieval Ashkenazi Jews that no longer exists. The analysis, the first of its kind from a Jewish cemetery and the product of years-long negotiations between scientists, historians and religious leaders, shows that Ashkenazim have become genetically …

Ashkenazi Jews have become genetically more similar over time Read More »